BOOKS

Want to get ultra-nerdy?  Check out some of my favorite books.

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Slow Death By Rubber Duck

Easily one of the most readable books on environmental toxins. It takes a slightly humorous and very real-world look at what we’re exposed to daily.

Breasts

Breasts is one of my favorite books, looking at everything from the history of the boob job, to the myriad toxic chemicals that end up inside them.

Toxin Toxout

This is the follow up to Slow Death By Rubber Duck, and seeks to answer the #1 question generated from that book: “How do I get this stuff out of me?”

Toxic Cocktail

An important read for anyone with brains. Haha, that’s all of us! This book explores the consequences of environmental chemical exposure on the human brain. A must read.

The Toxin Solution

Dr. Joseph Pizzorno, a naturopathic physician, and founding president of Bastyr University refers to environmental chemicals as “the primary driver of disease.” This book explores this problem and the daily lifestyle interventions to help us detoxify.

Clean, Green & Lean

One of my most dog-eared books that explores the role that chemicals play in metabolic diseases like insulin resistance, diabetes, and obesity, and helps to explain why our population keeps gaining weight.

The Fluoride Deception

Want to know that dark and lurid history of how fluoride ended up in our drinking water? Read this book. Exceptionally well written, heavily cited, and filled with more than you could ever want to know about this substance, including it’s ties to the Manhattan Project. Fascinating & disturbing.

The Autism Puzzle

This book explores the links between chemicals in our environment and rising rates of Autism. Published in 2012 with the finding that 1 in 88 children were diagnosed with Autism, this book provides a solid foundation of why that number is now 1 in 68 and in some places 1 in 42.

Not Just A Pretty Face

One of the first books on toxins I read. Published back in 2007 (a little outdated by now, but still worth reading), this book explores the beauty industry, the ingredients they use, and the rampant greenwashing and pinkwashing they employ.

No More Dirty Looks

A great companion to Not Just A Pretty Face, this book also exposures the ingredients used in the personal care product industry and what to look for in safer products.

Our Stolen Future

This book is a must read for those in the environmental health space, written by the late Theo Colburn, who spent her career studying endocrine disruption. Our Stolen Future examines the ways that certain synthetic chemicals interfere with hormonal messages involved in the control of growth and development, especially in the fetus.

Silent Spring

Published in 1962, this book is credited with launching the environmental movement as we know it. This is a must read book to put into perspective how long we’ve been aware of toxic chemicals in our environment and their health effects.

Exposed

One of my absolute favorite book that explores the public policy around chemicals in commerce, how those policies differ between the US and the EU, and why many multinational companies lean on our legal system to shied them from responsibility. This one will fire you up and piss you off at the same time!

The Truth About The Drug Companies

While this book is not directly related to environmental toxins, it’s a super interesting (and frustrating) look at how pharmaceuticals make it to the market, and the maneuvering and manipulation of the pharma industry.

Chasing Molecules

Want to know how to solve most of the problems about toxic chemicals in our environment? It starts with Green Chemistry, a small, but growing movement to ensure that newly synthesized compounds aren’t toxic to humans, animals, or the broader ecosystems.